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General Health

Strength Training Curbs Hip, Spinal Bone Loss in Women With Osteoporosis

Women with osteoporosis – a skeletal disease that erodes bone density, weakens bone strength and increases the risk of fractures – might think taking it easy is the best way to prevent bone breaks. Yet an updated review of studies confirms that compared to staying sedentary, strength exercises boost bone density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Prolonged periods of inactivity ...

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Modified Fat Diet Key to Lowering Heart Disease Risk

The debate between good fat versus bad fat continues, as a new evidence review finds that a modified fat diet — and not a low fat diet — might be the real key to reducing one’s risk of heart disease. A low fat diet replaces saturated fat — such as or animal or dairy fat — with starchy foods, fruits ...

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Teen Weight Began to Rise in 1990s, New Study Finds

A new study that looks at weight change over decades finds that the obesity epidemic in teens and young adults has its roots in the late 1990s and early 2000s, when body weights began to rise. But not everyone was affected equally. “Females are at greater risk than males, and black females are at greatest risk,” said study co-author Kathleen ...

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Drug Speeds Up Slow Labor but Doesn’t Prevent C-Sections

A new Cochrane review says that oxytocin, a medication often used to quicken slow-paced labor in its early stages, doesn’t boost the prospects for normal births. Riskier births that required cesarean section or the use of forceps didn’t become less common. If doctors want to reduce the need for potentially dangerous emergency C-sections, “we need to develop better ways of ...

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Teen Well-Being Spills Over Into Young Adult Health

A new study finds that teens with a positive sense of well-being are more likely to report being healthy in young adulthood. The research suggests this is not just because teenagers who feel good about themselves are healthy in the first place. A sense of well-being in teens appears to have an affect “above and beyond how adolescent health predicts ...

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After an Emergency, Comprehensive Care Is Best for Older Patients

Older people rushed to the emergency room are more likely to be living at home up to a year later if they receive a comprehensive and age-appropriate evaluation during their hospital stay. That’s the finding of a new review of recent studies that evaluate the usefulness of a comprehensive geriatric assessment, or CGA. “Rather than a single assessment, a CGA ...

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Sexually Victimized Girls With PTSD Not More Likely to Binge Drink Later

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common outcome of sexual assault among many teenage girls, but they do not necessarily cope by binge drinking, a new study finds. When they occur in these girls, PTSD symptoms, such as unwanted recollections of the assault, decrease over time. The study found that those girls who had ever experienced sexual victimization reported more ...

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Parents’ Military Deployments Take Emotional Toll on Teens

When military deployments call for their parents to serve abroad, adolescents have a tough time adjusting, and a new study shows their moods often lead to risky behavior. The wars waging in Iraq and Afghanistan for most of the past decade have significantly influenced the mental health of many children of U.S. servicemen and women. The study, which appears online ...

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With Diabetes, Untreated Depression Can Lead to Serious Eye Disease

Patients with diabetes who also suffer from depression are more likely to develop a serious complication known as diabetic retinopathy, a disease that damages the eye’s retina, a five-year study finds. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when diabetes is not properly managed and is now the leading cause of blindness in patients between 25 and 74 years old, according to the study ...

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High School Students Today Less Likely to Be Heavy Smokers

A new study found that of the 19.5 percent of high school students who call themselves smokers, most don’t smoke daily or frequently. Between 1991 and 2009, heavy smoking declined among public and private high school students, but light smoking increased, according to a national survey. Among teen smokers, occasional smoking grew from 67.2 percent to 79.4 percent while heavy ...

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