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Treating Women’s Depression Might Help Them Lose Weight

For many women coping with obesity and depression, new research finds that improving your mood might be the link to losing weight. The new study, which appears in the November/December issue of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry, cites past surveys that show having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more — classified as obese — increases a person’s ...

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Popping a Pill Can Help Some Alcoholics Curb Drinking

A little-used medication can help treat alcoholism, an updated review of studies confirms. At any given time, about 5 percent of the population suffers from an addiction to alcohol, often with devastating consequences to work, family, friends and health. Twelve-step programs have been the mainstay for helping alcoholics to quit drinking, but a significant number of people who try these ...

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Multiple Sclerosis More Linked to Depression in Minorities

Multiple sclerosis (MS) can cause significant physical impairment, including fatigue, pain, muscle spasms, tremors and dizziness. For many with MS, the disease wreaks havoc with emotional well being, too, and according to a new study, minorities might especially be at risk for developing depressive symptoms. Of study participants with the neurological condition, 44.2 percent of Latinos and 45.8 percent of ...

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Infants Not Exempt From Obesity Epidemic

Most people understand that children are part of the obesity epidemic. However, a revealing new study finds that obesity might begin in babies as young as nine months old. “With the consistent evidence that the percent of overweight children has steadily increased over the past decade, we weren’t surprised by the prevalence rates we found in our study, but we ...

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Tongue Piercing: Infection More Likely With Metal Jewelry

A stud or ring in their tongue might be an essential fashion accessory for many young adults, but piercing comes at the cost of medical risks, including infection. The material that tongue jewelry is made of might make a difference, according to a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health, which suggests that stainless steel studs are far more welcoming ...

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Parents Want to Talk Sex With Teens, But Fear Advice Falls on Deaf Ears

Kids learn a great deal about sexuality from friends and from the media, but parents and teens agree: Parents should be the most important providers of information about sex and sexuality. In a new study, researchers interviewed 1,605 parents of primarily white, school-aged children in Minnesota, asking where they thought kids should get their information about sexuality compared to where ...

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Most Seniors Don’t Get Shingles Vaccination, CDC Finds

Although a vaccine to prevent shingles has been available since 2006, less than 7 percent of U.S. seniors — the demographic most frequently affected by the disease — chose to receive the vaccination as of 2008, finds a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The vaccine reduces the risk of getting shingles by half and ...

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Are You Medically Prepared for a Natural Disaster?

Imagine having to evacuate your home quickly as 60 mph winds shatter your windows, water crawls under your front door and the electricity cuts leaving your house as dark as the inside of a coffee can. Would you be prepared? Now visualize being one of the 56 million Americans with a disability, such as wheelchair dependence, or one of the ...

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After Games, 40 Percent of Sports Fans Have Booze on Board

Eight percent of fans who agreed to be tested after attending professional football and baseball games were too drunk to legally drive, a new study finds, and 40 percent had booze in their bodies. The study has limitations: it does not disclose where the games took place, it excludes fans not old enough to legally drink and it was limited ...

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Mechanical Versus Manual CPR—Too Close to Call

Pushing on the chest to simulate the heart’s rhythmic pumping action is an essential part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiac arrest. In recent decades, manufacturers have developed several mechanical devices that claim to perform CPR more effectively than human efforts alone. However, the first systematic review of randomized clinical trials comparing mechanical to manual chest compressions has failed to demonstrate ...

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